Wind-up toys by Jesco von Puttkamer

After finishing the above Playsam review, I started looking around which other items Unica Home sells, and I got lucky, because I found my inspiration for the following two features there. Originally, I had planned to write about more traditional wooden toys, but I guess I can always do that tomorrow or the day after.

Anyway, here are great wind-up tin-toys by designer Jesco von Puttkamer. They are hand-made in Germany, which makes them one-of-a-kind, as well as high quality products. Jesco’s unusual designs comprise a telephone with moving receiver, a boat, a police car (which I find has more resemblance with a tractor, but never mind), a swiss car and a Red Cross ambulance that can both climb uphill due to their assymetric cross-shaped rear wheel, as well as a set of race cars, which are a bit smaller than the others, but at least they come two per package, turning the lever increases their speed drastically. All tin vehicles are simply beautiful to look at, and were designed with happy memories of childhood and the joy of simple toys in mind. Once wound up with the included key, they run for about two minutes.

However, part of their nostalgic charme stems from the fact that these gems do have exposed gears like in the old days, and also the sharp edges make them unsuitable for children, at leat for the small ones. But I am sure many older kids or adults will just love them for their decorative value. Arriving with a numbered and signed instruction leaflet, they are a great collector’s item after all. And surely those parents who buy these precious cars for their children are responsible enough to only let the kids play with them under supervision until they are old enough not to hurt themselves accidentally (at least I hope so).

Available at Unica Home , $55.00-$75.00.

If you’re interested in a little more information about the artist, read on, otherwise, just skip to my next entry 🙂
After a bit of research I managed to discovered Jesco von Puttkamer’s website and thought I should also share some pictures of his studio and some other works.

I had never heard of him before, but apparently he must have some reputation, since he has already completed contract work for many big companies, such as Volkswagen and Fuji, and actually began his artistic career recycling leftovers from industrial production, out of which he created large metal sculptures which could be turned, twisted, pulled or otherwise set in motion, making an awful lot of noise. His current focus is on small collectors toys that double as objets d’art and are produced by himself, using the brand name ‘Jetzt Produkte’.


You can also order his creations directly from him, with the order form on his website, and he also completes custom orders. But there’s one big catch though: His website is only in German! No wonder why it was so difficult to find it in the first place, and of course apart from the fact that he belongs to a widely extended German noble family whose tradition it is to name their first-born Jesco. Thus you can imagine there are quite a few of them historically, among them is a rocket enginer and senior NASA manager, as well as a governor of German Cameroon, back in the days before World War I, when Germany had joined the European rush to divide Africa among themselves (see Wikipedia). By the way,’von’ means from in German and is a prefix denoting nobility. More precisely, it refers to the city or village under patronage. So Jesco von Puttkamer’s ancestry must be going back to some (probably tiny) place called Puttkamer.
OK, enough off topic rambling, back to children’s toys…



Schylling toys: Let grandpa get nostalgic
June 11, 2008, 12:29 pm
Filed under: Toys and games | Tags: , , , , ,

Today’s feature is still missing one important thing, that part children care about the most, the toys that is.  The most affordable source for great vintage reproductions I could find is Schylling.  They really have some sweet tin toys and ride -ons that will make grandpa wish he were a little boy again, just so he could hop on that little racer like he used to in the good old days.  So letting your little ones bring along their nostalgic toys the next time you visit the grandparents may initiate some great story-telling and reminiscence of their favorite childhood memories.  And I bet your kids will find it quite fascinating to hear about a world of non electric, non-battery operated toys.  Schylling’s old-style robot toys on the other hand are just the right thing to make dad go back in time.  So whichever you chose, nostalgic fun is guaranteed!  But if you don’t care for a historic chit-chat, Schylling’s range of classical toys is fun to play with anyhow, and a real eyecatcher in the playroom, too, one you will be proud to put on the shelves, and don’t want to be hidden away in a toy box.

Available in Schylling’s online shop, ride-on $ 79.99, carousel $ 24.99, robot $ 17.99, plane $ 14.99.